Weekly Trends
Shows weekly trends for requests, visits, visitors, etc. This report is most useful when the database contains logs from at least two weeks.
Report created on 4/5/99.
Covering the period Sunday, February 28, 1999 to Saturday, April 03, 1999 (inclusive)

Detail

Most Common Source Sites Per Week
Shows which other web sites have links that brought visitors to this site in each of the past weeks. This does not include any visitors that arrived by typing a URL. This information is only available when logs contain REFERER data. See also 'Most Common Source URL' for more detailed information. Also note that this element specifically hides all source sites that did not produce at least 20 requests during a week.
Cannot be calculated because your web server logs did not contain the REFERRER field. See Help for more information.

Most Popular Browsers Per Week
Shows which web browsers (Netscape, Microsoft, etc.) are used most frequently by visitors. Note that AOL, Compuserve and Prodigy users are probably visiting the site more than these numbers imply because these services use Proxy Servers to buffer requests. For example, if 300 AOL users visited the site, only the first request would appear because AOL would supply the next 299 users with the same page that the first visitor saw without even asking the site if the page had changed. This information is only available when logs contain USER_AGENT data. Also note that this element specifically hides all browsers that did not produce at least 100 requests during a week.
Cannot be calculated because your web server logs did not contain the USER_AGENT field. See Help for more information.

Definitions
Requests
A request occurs when a web server is asked to provide a page, graphic or other object. This is frequently called a Hit. Requests may be generated either by visitor going to a page or by the page itself requesting an object (usually a graphic). Using the number of requests to gauge the popularity of a site can be misleading because pages with lots of embedded graphics can generate many more requests than sites with simpler graphics. For that reason, the number of visits or the number of HTML page requests will probably give a more accurate activity picture.
Visitors
A visitor is usually defined simply as a unique IP address. A particular IP address may represent a unique person but, more often, one IP is shared by many people. If your site uses persistent cookies to better identify people, Hit List can also produce reports that calculate visitors based on a combination of unique IP addresses and cookies.
Visits
A visit is a collection of requests that represent all the pages and graphics seen by a particular visitor at one time. For example, a visitor to your site may go to 10 HTML pages and indirectly request 25 graphic elements. Those 35 requests represent one visit. The total number of visits is usually more than the total number of visitors because each visitor can visit the site more than once. Visits are just estimates because there is no way to be certain that a series of requests actually belongs to the same person, or, for that matter, to the same person during the same visit. Hit List determines visits based on several factors including IP addresses, cookies and the delay between consecutive requests.

Report generated by Marketwave Hit List Standard Edition v3. http://www.marketwave.com/ Phone: +1 206 682 6801